August 01,2018

Exploratory Study Shows Neumentix™ May Promote Energy When Stressed

An exploratory study presented at Experimental Biology tested the effects of Neumentix on ten highly-trained military operatives in a tactical operation.

Operatives supplemented with 900 mg Neumentix or placebo for 16 days, then performed a high-risk operation including 24 hours of sleep deprivation. Operatives completed tests assessing subjective feelings of energy and alertness prior to supplementation and again after the completion of the high-risk operation. Operatives also performed a task requiring the correct identification of a target at the beginning and the end of the study.

Researchers found that all subjects taking Neumentix correctly identified targets at the end of the supplementation period, compared to just 60 percent of subjects taking placebo. Preliminary data also indicates Neumentix may have improved operatives' feelings of energy and alertness compared to placebo. 

“More research is needed, but the preliminary results show Neumentix may improve feelings of energy in healthy adults under stress or sleep-deprived conditions,” said Brenda Fonseca, Senior Global Technical Service Manager at Kemin Human Nutrition and Health.

Stress is not an issue unique to highly-trained operatives. Globally, it's estimated that 75-90 percent of all medical visits are stress-related.1 A recent sur­­­­vey from the American Psychological Association reported that 45 percent of Americans had trouble sleeping at least one night in the last month because of stress.

“We know stress can negatively impact our mental performance in important areas of executive function,” said Fonseca, “we also know stress can rob us of energy and make us feel drained.  Most of us aren’t able to take a vacation from the daily demands of life, so an ingredient showing it can help us feel energized even under stress is very exciting."

To read more about the study, view the abstract. To learn more about Neumentix, click here.

Sign up for news from Kemin Human Nutrition and Health

References

1. Global Stress Summit. American Institute of Stress, 2018.