Milk Response

 

The research with chromium in dairy cattle since the turn of the century has shown chromium supplementation is beneficial for improving milk yield in transition cows, maintaining milk yield in heat-stressed cows and enhancing reproductive performance in dairy cows. The calculation of the weighted average milk response from all the chromium research between 2000 and 2015, and the sensitivity analysis at differing milk prices, allows producers to understand the impact chromium can have on herd profitability.

 

The utilization of glucose by the animal's body is governed by specific hierarchical processes and is dependent on the type of stress the animal is facing. Optimized glucose utilization can result in better animal maintenance, production, immunity, growth and reproduction. 

Review of the Milk Yield Response to Chromium Supplementation in Lactating Cows

Figure 1 demonstrates the effects of supplementing chromium on milk production. Seventeen published articles between 2000 and 2015 from refereed journals focusing on dairy cows were used to generate the figure. The graph depicts the milk yield response to chromium supplementation within a university controlled study in comparison to the control (i.e. non-chromium supplemented cows). This summary includes different chromium sources fed at different levels and is not limited to KemTRACE® Chromium.

Figure 1. Effect of chromium supplementation in lactating dairy cow diets on response to daily milk yield, lbs/h/d1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17

Chromium Sensitivity Analysis

A statistical weighted average of the refereed journal publications shown in Figure 1 was calculated. The weighted average response in daily milk yield calculated out at 3.55 lbs/head/day. Table 1 shows a sensitivity analysis based on differing milk prices ranging from $11/hundredweight (cwt) to $16.50/cwt assuming cows achieve anywhere from 10% to 100% of the weighted average milk response. 

Table 1. KemTRACE® Chromium price sensitivity analysis

*Average cost of KemTRACE Chromium supplementation = $0.05/head/day

Chromium and Milk Response Literature

Milk Response

The Effect of Chromium Propionate on Lactating Jersey Cows in Early to Peak Lactation

The research with chromium in dairy cattle since the turn of the century has shown chromium supplementation is beneficial for improving milk yield in transition cows, maintaining milk yield in heat-stressed cows and enhancing reproductive performance in dairy cows.

A field trial was conducted at a dairy in the Central Valley region of California. Approximately 500 cows in second or greater lactation in the high producing group (60-120 DIM) were used. The objective was to determine if chromium propionate had a benefit to dairy cows in early to peak lactation.

Effects of Chromium Propionate Fed Through Periparturient Period and Starch Source Fed Postpartum on Productive Performance and Dry Matter Intake of Holstein Cows

Literature Review: The Effect of Chromium Supplementation in Lactating Dairy Cow Diets on Response in Daily Milk Yield

Forty-eight Holsteins entering second or greater lactation were used to determine milk production, DMI and metabolic responses to chromium propionate supplementation through the periparturient period and starch source in postpartum.

Learn more about the effect chromium supplementation can have in lactating dairy cow diets on response in daily milk yield, lbs/h/d.

 

References

1Yasui, T. et al., 2014. J. Dairy Sci. 97:1-11.

2Vargas-Rodriguez et al., 2014. J. Dairy Sci. 97:3815-3821.

3Ferguson, J. et al., 2013. J. Dairy Sci. 96(E-Supplement 1):127.

4Kafilzadeh et al., 2012. Biol. Trace Elem. Res. 149:42-49.

5Targhibi et al., 2012. Asian J. Anim. Vet. Adv. 7(11):1205-1211.

6Rockwell & Allen et al., 2011. J. Dairy Sci. 94(E-Supplement 1): 738.

7Nikkhah et al., 2011. J. Anim. Physiol. Anim. Nutr. 95:81-89.

8Soltan et al., 2010. J. Anim. Physiol. Anim. Nutr. (Berl). 94(2):264-272.

9Sadri et al., 2009. J. Dairy Sci. 92:5411-5418.

10An-Qiang et al., 2009. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition. 8(7):940-945.

11McNamara & Valdez et al., 2007. J. Dairy Sci. 90:3467-3474.

12Terramoccia et al., 2005. Asian - Aust. J. Anim. Sci. 18:1098-1104.

13Smith et al., 2005. J. Dairy Sci. 88:255-263.

14Al-Saidy et al., 2004. Animal Feed Science and Technology. 117:223-233.

15Bryan et al., 2014. J. Dairy Sci. 87:4269-4277.

16Pechova et al., 2002. ACTA VET. BRNO. 71:9-18.

17Hayirli et al., 2001. J. Dairy Sci. 84:1218-1230.

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